Saturday, June 13, 2009

That reminds me...

Several years ago, I had a visitor from San Francisco who offered to help me in the kitchen. I put her to work cutting up the veg for the salad. I knew she knew where the garbage pail was, so I was surprised when she asked me where to put the inedible bits from the veg. She was appalled that I would actually throw such things in the trash.

I guess it all makes sense now-- San Francisco is going to fine people for throwing scraps in the garbage, making composting mandatory. I've had a compost heap before, and I like it, and one day when I cook more frequently, I'll do so again. However, I wouldn't dream of living in a place which mandated me not to throw scraps in my own damned trash, a service for which I already pay.

Considering her husband spent about 3 hours a day driving to and from work, the way I see it, her carbon footprint was loads larger than mine. I'm ready to be judged.

6 comments:

jon said...

Compost heaps are great, but mandating them by law is the workings of lunatics. I say, keep the scraps and pelt the politicians as they pass. It's the right thing to do.

Anonymous said...

Besides, if you live in an apartment, or a brownstone (side-by-side) with no yard, where are you going to put the scraps to compost? In your living room?

As a variation to the above (save & pelt), find out who your local politician is and MAIL him the scraps. Do it while they're still fresh (non-stinky), and obviously, no return address.

Is it something in the air or water in the California cities that makes them the way they are?

B Woodman
III

Miz Minka said...

I'm not surprised. Part and parcel of life on the Left Coast. Aren't you glad you're in Texas?

DirtCrashr said...

Compost heaps by law, in a cold city of steel, concrete and asphalt is...designed to only make some people feel better about themselves.

g bro said...

Just call me Bigfoot.

Brigid said...

We have a small county paper that delivers free. Except I didn't WANT to have the paper delivered. I'm gone a lot and don't want it piling up, especially as I don't read it. When the box was full the delivery person just throw the paper on the ground where it got all wet and fell apart. I called, I wrote, so did my neighbors. We could not get them to stop this paper no one never ordered. I left a note. The delivery guy threw the paper on the ground in the rain anyway. The street would be littered with damp paper. If it wasn't raining, they just blew all around. I started saving up ALL the damp papers til I got a big heaping stinky bag full. So did my neighbors. We then left them all on the the porch of the editor with a thank you note.

The papers in our neighborhood stopped.